News

Christmas comes early! Families are shopping earlier to spread the cost of presents with candle and pottery making kits among popular gifts – with focus on ‘style over substance’ as Brits strive to create Insta-worthy ‘Chic-mas’ scenes in their homes


Families across Britain are starting their Christmas shopping as early as November in a bid to spread the cost of the pricey festive season.

As the cost-of-living crisis stretches into its third year, more people are expected to buy fewer and cheaper gifts, according to the John Lewis festive traditions tracker report, which analyses sales and YouGov polling. 

Homemade gifts will be on the rise, with sales of candle making and pottery kits soaring,   while around 40 per cent of people will be re-gifting presents and feel no shame about this. 

Amid the findings, the report found Christmas is no longer considered a 12 day period for most with festivities instead stretching over 45 days.

Planning ahead for Christmas begins in November for a fifth of people, mainly women, who are either excited to get their shopping underway or hoping to bag a bargain.  

Christmas is no longer considered a 12 day period for most Brits, with festivities instead stretching over 45 days, a new survey has found  (stock image)

Christmas is no longer considered a 12 day period for most Brits, with festivities instead stretching over 45 days, a new survey has found  (stock image)

Consumers are also buying more unusual baubles such as oat milk cartons, as demand for these types of decoration are up 43 per cent from last year (stock image)

Consumers are also buying more unusual baubles such as oat milk cartons, as demand for these types of decoration are up 43 per cent from last year (stock image)

PRESENTS 

As the cost-of-living crisis stretches into its third year, more Britons are expected to buy fewer and cheaper gifts.

Homemade presents are expected to soar becoming ‘one of the biggest trends for 2023′ after sales showed an uptake in demand for candle and soap making kits, as well as at-home pottery sets. 

Around 44 per cent of under 35s said they would be making or baking rather than buying gifts this year. Others might opt for using ethical brands.  

In another cost saving measure around 40 per cent also expected to re-gift presents this year, all feeling no guilt in passing on their unwanted presents. 

The average person is expected to begin their Christmas shopping on November 10, which John Lewis has said is its biggest day for sale in decorations.

More and more people are also returning to shopping in person, rising by 13 per cent compared with previous years where high streets were struck down by the pandemic.

Fewer Christmas cards will also be posted through doors this year as the cost of stamps left a third of people posting fewer items. 

Homemade presents are expected to soar becoming ' one of the biggest trends for 2023' after sales showed an uptake in demand for candle, soap and pottery making kits

Homemade presents are expected to soar becoming ‘ one of the biggest trends for 2023’ after sales showed an uptake in demand for candle, soap and pottery making kits

As the cost-of-living crisis stretches into its third year, more Britons are expected to buy fewer and cheaper gifts 

TREES 

For a third of families Christmas tree is no longer enough and opt to display two firs throughout their homes dressed up with baubles and bright lights.

The idea is the second decorated tree brings a bit more festive spirit to the house – brightening up an otherwise dull office space or hallway. 

Four in ten of families who have children will opt for the show tree 

The retailer estimates that the sale of trees will peak between December 1 and 5.

People remain divided over whether artificial trees are better for the environment, with 35 per cent arguing for fake trees, while 33 per cent argue real ones are more sustainable.

The majority of Brits will use artificial trees, with 11 per cent having both.  

A small proportion (seven per cent) of eager Brits will put up their tree in November, while the majority will set it up on the first weekend of December. 

Kathleen Mitchell, Commercial Director for John Lewis, said: ‘While some traditions have stood the test of time, others are changing at pace and we’re seeing customers spread both the excitement and the cost.

‘We even saw a spike in Christmas tree searches immediately after the summer holidays. Following the initial excitement though, most people start shopping seriously from early November.’

FOOD

Food remains the most important component of Christmas for the majority, with many expected to splash out more this year.

With so many different treats available 40 per cent will opt for a ‘pudding gap’ between their main meal and tucking into desert.

Gen Z are more likely to shun a traditional turkey roast, with on in ten opting for a take-away on Christmas Day, while a fifth are having a meat-free celebration. 

Food remained a central focus for most people this year, with 23 per cent expected to spend more on their grocery shopping

Food remained a central focus for most people this year, with 23 per cent expected to spend more on their grocery shopping

Waitrose is expecting its biggest ever sale of veggie and vegan products, with the range being up 48 per cent on previous years. 

The supermarket has also seen a rise in people choosing frozen food to spread the cost.

‘When household budgets are stretched we see people planning further ahead for good times like Christmas. Searches on our website for Christmas products have been consistently up on last year since the end of August,’ a Waitrose expert said.

‘Our chefs, product developers and suppliers have created over 140 new products for this Christmas including the biggest frozen Christmas range that we’ve developed for quite a few years. 

‘These include new frozen vegetable sides and frozen party food which went on sale in September to help customers afford really great, ethically sourced products by spreading the cost.’

DECORATIONS

This year many Brits are striving to create a ‘Chic-mas’ scene, worthy of being showed off on Instagram and TikTok, choosing more subtle decorations, with less flashy lights.

For a third of families Christmas tree is no longer enough and opt to display two firs throughout their homes dressed up with baubles and bright lights. 

The department store said it had seen a 96 per cent increase but savvy families are keeping the cost down by using energy-efficient bulbs. 

For a third of families Christmas tree is no longer enough and opt to display two firs throughout their homes dressed up with baubles and bright lights.

For a third of families Christmas tree is no longer enough and opt to display two firs throughout their homes dressed up with baubles and bright lights.

FESTIVE OUTFITS  

Gen Z and millennials are also ditching their best Christmas outfits, with 34 per cent dressing. A third of 18-24 said they plan to spend the whole day in pyjamas. 

Even the popularity of Christmas Day is plummeting. Less than half of Brits said that it was their favourite day of the season, while 25 per cent favoured Christmas Eve and 15 per cent preferred boxing day. 

One in four, however, intend to splash out on festive wear to show off throughout the Christmas season wearing their brightest and boldest colours. 



Source link

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button