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Guinness fans are in a froth over claims the double pour does NOT make the perfect pint: Stout aficionados rubbish Irish bartender’s revelation that 60 second resting time is just a ‘marketing ploy’


Guinness fans are in a froth over incendiary claims the double pour does not make the perfect pint and is just a ‘marketing ploy’. 

Pouring two-thirds of the pint and leaving it to rest for 60 to 80 seconds has become regular practice for any barman worth their salt – with Guinness insisting it is necessary to achieve the ‘perfect head height’ and ‘balanced flavour profile’.

As the company itself says: ‘Good things come to those who wait.’ 

But now an Irish barman based in the UK has ignited an almighty row by insisting the double pour is simply a marketing ploy and does not affect the stout’s quality or taste. 

Nate Brown, owner of Paloma Café, Soda & Friends and Nebula cocktail bars in London, dismissed the practice in an article entitled ‘there’s no such thing as the perfect Guinness pour’. 

Pouring two-thirds of the pint and leaving it to rest for 60 to 80 seconds has become regular practice for any barman worth their salt

Pouring two-thirds of the pint and leaving it to rest for 60 to 80 seconds has become regular practice for any barman worth their salt

But Nate Brown, owner of Paloma Café, Soda & Friends and Nebula cocktail bars in London , dismissed the practice in an article entitled 'there's no such thing as the perfect Guinness pour'

But Nate Brown, owner of Paloma Café, Soda & Friends and Nebula cocktail bars in London , dismissed the practice in an article entitled ‘there’s no such thing as the perfect Guinness pour’

Oisin Rogers, co-owner of the Devonshire in Soho, described Mr Brown's assertion as 'absolute horses***', while Guinness fan David Lace insisted it was 'not true'

Oisin Rogers, co-owner of the Devonshire in Soho, described Mr Brown’s assertion as ‘absolute horses***’, while Guinness fan David Lace insisted it was ‘not true’ 

‘This isn’t done for the beer’s sake; it was practice in the Guinness brewery to speed up serving the masses at home time — the brand has always had the savviest of marketing departments,’ he wrote in FT Magazine.

Diageo, Guinness’ parent company, quickly hit out against the claim that the two-part pour is simply a marketing stunt. 

And Oisin Rogers, co-owner of the Devonshire in Soho, described Mr Brown’s assertion as ‘absolute horses***’. 

He tweeted: ‘It’s impossible to get a correctly presented pint of Guinness in one pour because the meniscus is negative. 

‘Therefore a dimple rather than a dome. Also he’d texture completely disappointing leading to a far inferior drink. There.’

The row quickly bubbled over on social media as aficionados defended the two-part pour policy. 

‘Not true, has to be in 2 stages, too many times it’s been poured terribly in one go,’ said David Lace, an Irishman living in the UK. 

The row quickly bubbled over on social media as aficionados defended the two-part pour policy - while others claimed Mr Brown had a point

The row quickly bubbled over on social media as aficionados defended the two-part pour policy – while others claimed Mr Brown had a point 

Jonathan Smith, a cricket coach, said: The two stages are embedded in a proper pour when you pause briefly before pouring the last third so that you pour into a formed head which is where you, for example, paint the shamrock – but also prevents an excessive head.’ 

Meanwhile, Guinness obsessive Ben Allcock, who lives in Cheshire, suggested the two-part pour was part of a sacred ritual. 

He told MailOnline: ‘Whether or not it actually affects the quality of the pint (in my humble opinion, it does) is in some ways irrelevant; the ”ceremony” of the double pour is an important part of the Guinness experience and differentiates it from any other drink on tap. 

‘There’s something comforting about seeing the bar staff taking such care over the black stuff, witnessing the surge of the creamy foam and seeing the head gradually developing. 

‘All these elements contribute to the excitement and joy of the process and the slightly longer wait certainly makes the pay off even sweeter. 

‘Whatever the origin of this method, I say keep it going, as it brings a bit of extra warmth to this cold heart of mine.’

Kate Middleton enjoys a pint of Guinness at the company's Storehouse Gravity Bar during a visit to Dublin with Prince William in 2020

Kate Middleton enjoys a pint of Guinness at the company’s Storehouse Gravity Bar during a visit to Dublin with Prince William in 2020 

Guinness obsessive Ben Allcock, who lives in Cheshire, suggested the two-part pour was part of a sacred ritual

Guinness obsessive Ben Allcock, who lives in Cheshire, suggested the two-part pour was part of a sacred ritual

A Diageo spokesman told MailOnline in response to Mr Brown's comments: 'This is not the case'

A Diageo spokesman told MailOnline in response to Mr Brown’s comments: ‘This is not the case’ 

Despite his controversial claim, Mr Brown still pours Guinness in two parts at his London bars because ‘it’s what our guests want’.

His heretical suggestion found support among some former barmen. 

Joe Mealing said: ‘Yeah I used to work behind a bar and we had decent Guinness. Could do it in one pour.’

Harry Rose, editor of Which? magazine, added: ‘Can confirm you get a slightly larger head if you pour in one go, that’s it. When working in pubs I always used to pour my own after-work pints that way.’

But stout fan Gareth Edwards insisted: ‘If it was true I’m not sure it’d have been universal in every pub in every small Irish town including those doing Murphy’s or Beamish. Or that at the pubs doing so you’re guaranteed a good pint of stout.’ 

A Diageo spokesman told MailOnline in response to Mr Brown’s comments: ‘This is not the case. 

‘In order to get the right consistency in the head, get the right head height, and the dome over the top of the glass perfectly, you need to pour in two stages.’ 



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