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Just why ARE EVs so expensive to repair? Electric car owners forced to pay 50% MORE after a crash due to limited number of mechanics and risk of batteries exploding


Electric vehicle owners are facing repair bills that are thousands of dollars higher than those for gas cars.

A lack of specially-trained mechanics, extra safety measures for potentially explosive batteries and a greater need for replacement parts are to blame. 

Repairing an EV after a crash cost $6,587 on average last year – 56 percent higher than the $4,215 for all vehicles, according to research from auto data company CCC Intelligent Solutions.

Electric cars are promoted as needing less maintenance than their gas-powered counterparts – with tasks such as regular oil changes no longer necessary. 

But – when it comes to collision repair – they need more work than regular vehicles, according to CCC Intelligent Solutions. 

The report found that last year, on average, an electric car repair required roughly double the replacement parts compared to a standard gas car. 

In 2022, repairing an EV after a crash cost $6,587 on average, compared to $4,215 for all vehicles, according to research from auto data company CCC Intelligent Solutions

In 2022, repairing an EV after a crash cost $6,587 on average, compared to $4,215 for all vehicles, according to research from auto data company CCC Intelligent Solutions

‘People are used to hearing that EVs have fewer parts than a combustion vehicle, but that is not the case in collision repair,’ Marc Fredman, chief strategy officer at CCC Intelligent Solutions, told The Wall Street Journal

The way that many EV parts are welded in the vehicles, he said, means the components cannot be repaired and have to be replaced instead. 

Cars containing lithium-ion batteries also need special storage as they can be a fire risk when damaged, which adds both time and cost to the repair process, Scott Benavidez, chairman of the trade group Automotive Service Association told the outlet. 

Repairs costs are also higher since the bodies of EVs also tend to be made from more expensive alumium rather than steel.

There are also a limited number of repair shops that are able to take on this work, meaning they are able to charge a premium for services. 

The CCC Intelligent Solutions report noted, however, that EVs are, on average, more than four years newer than the average vehicle. They also tend to cost over $30,000 more – which also pushes up repair costs.  

It found the need for specialist care also means customers face longer wait times for repairs. 

According to the report, it takes 25 percent longer to get an EV into a body shop compared to a gas car. And once mechanics start working, it typically takes 57 days to fix, compared to 45 days for non-EVs. 

There are signs that costs could come down as more independent shops become trained in EV repairs and carmakers build up a supply of spare parts.

But, in the meantime, higher repair costs are also driving up insurance premiums for EV owners. 

Brent Shreve and his wife Molly told DailyMail.com earlier this year how the insurance on their Tesla Model Y was double that of the cover on their Volkswagen Atlas.

Insurer State Farm quoted the couple – who are in their mid 30s – $78 for the gas car and $140 for the electric vehicle – despite the models being almost-identical in size and costing virtually the same amount.

Brent Shreve and his wife Molly (pictured) live in Fishers, Indiana

Brent Shreve and his wife Molly (pictured) live in Fishers, Indiana

Insurer State Farm quoted the couple - who are in their mid 30s - $78 for the gas car (left) and $140 for the electric vehicle (right)

Insurer State Farm quoted the couple – who are in their mid 30s – $78 for the gas car (left) and $140 for the electric vehicle (right)

It comes after a separate survey found EV owners report far more problems with their cars and trucks than owners of gas-powered vehicles.

A Consumer Reports survey of more than 330,000 car owners found electric cars encountered 79 percent more problems than those with combustion engines.

The research said EV owners most frequently reported troubles with battery and charging systems, as well as flaws in body panels and the fit of interior parts.

The report noted, however, that EV manufacturers are still learning how to construct new types of vehicles, and some problems would be teething issues which would be ironed out over time. 



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